Building Family Wealth Over The Next 5 Years

Building Family Wealth Over The Next 5 Years | Keeping Current Matters

As the economy continues to improve, more and more Americans are seeing their personal financial situations also improving. Instead of just getting by, many are now beginning to save and find other ways to build their net worth. One way to dramatically increase their family wealth is through the acquisition of real estate.

For example, let’s assume a young couple purchases and closes on a $250,000 home in January. What will that home be worth five years down the road?

Pulsenomics surveys a nationwide panel of over one hundred economists, real estate experts and investment & market strategists every quarter. They ask them to project how residential prices will appreciate over the next five years. According to their latestsurvey, here is how much value that $250,000 house will gain in the coming years.

Family Wealth Earned with Home Equity | Keeping Current Matters

Over a five year period, that homeowner can build their home equity to over $40,000. And, in many cases, home equity is large portion of a family’s overall net worth.

Bottom Line

If you are looking to better your family’s long-term financial situation, buying your dream home might be a great option.

Home Prices: Where Are They Headed Over The Next 5 Years?

Home Prices: Where Are They Headed Over The Next 5 Years? | Keeping Current Matters

Today, many real estate conversations center on housing prices and where they may be headed. That is why we like the Home Price Expectation Survey.

Every quarter, Pulsenomics surveys a nationwide panel of over one hundred economists, real estate experts and investment & market strategists about where they believe prices are headed over the next five years. They then average the projections of all 100+ experts into a single number.

The results of their latest survey:

Home values will appreciate by 3.9% by the end of 2015, 3.4% in 2016 and 3.1% in each of the following four years (as shown below). That means the average annual appreciation will be 3.2% over the next 5 years.

Projected Mean Appreciation | Keeping Current Matters

The prediction for cumulative appreciation rose from 18.1% to 21.6% by 2020. Even the experts making up the most bearish quartile of the survey still are projecting a cumulative appreciation of 13.8%.

Cumulative House Appreciation | Keeping Current Matters

Bottom Line

Individual opinions make headlines. We believe the survey is a fairer depiction of future values.

Home Equity Increasing as Home Prices Rise [INFOGRAPHIC]

Home Equity Increasing as Home Prices Rise [INFOGRAPHIC] | Keeping Current Matters

Some Highlights:

  • 91.9% of homes in the US have positive equity
  • 256,000 homes regained equity in the third quarter of 2015
  • 37.5 million homes have significant equity (defined as more than 20%)

FSBO, List Again or OTM? A Seller’s Dilemma

FSBO, List Again or OTM? A Seller's Dilemma | Keeping Current Matters

At the end of December, in every region of the country, hundreds of homeowners have a tough decision to make. The ‘listing for sale agreement’ on their house is about to expire and they now must decide to either take their house off the market (OTM), For Sale by Owner (FSBO) or list it again with the same agent or a different agent.

Let’s assume you or someone you know is in this situation and take a closer look at each possibility:

Taking Your Home off the Market

In all probability, after putting your house on the market and seeing it not sell, you’re going to be upset. You may be thinking that no one in the marketplace thought the house was worthy of the sales price.

Because you are upset, you may start to rationalize that selling wasn’t that important after all and say,

“Well, we didn’t really want to sell the house anyway. This idea of making a move right now probably doesn’t make sense.”

Don’t rationalize your dreams away. Instead, consider the reasons you decided to sell in the first place. Ask your family this simple question:

“What made us originally put our home up for sale?” 

If that reason made sense a few months ago when you originally listed the house, chances are it still makes sense now. Don’t give up on what your family hoped to accomplish or on goals your family hoped to attain.

Just because the house didn’t sell during the last listing contract doesn’t mean the house will never sell or that it shouldn’t be sold.

Re-Listing with your Existing Agent

For whatever reason, your house did not sell. Perhaps you now realize how difficult selling a house may be or that the listing price was too high, or perhaps you’re now acknowledging that you didn’t exactly listen to your agent’s advice.

If that is the case, you may want to give your existing agent a second chance. That’s a perfectly okay thing to do.

However, if your agent didn’t perform to the standard they promised when they listed your home you may want to either FSBO or try a different agent.

For Sale by Owner

You may now believe that listing your house with an agent is useless because your original agent didn’t accomplish the goal of selling the house. Trying to sell the house on your own this time may be alluring. You may think you will be in control and save on the commission.

But, is that true? Will you be able to negotiate each of the elements that make up a real estate transaction? Are you capable of putting together a comprehensive marketing plan? Do people who FSBO actually ‘net’ more money?

If you are thinking about FSBOing, take the time to first read: 5 Reasons You Shouldn’t For Sale by Owner.

List with a New Agent

After failing to sell your home, you may no longer trust your agent or what they say. However, don’t paint all real estate professionals with that same brush. Have you ever gotten a bad haircut before? Of course! Did you stop getting your hair cut or did you simply change hair stylists?

There is good and bad in every profession—good and bad hair stylists, agents, teachers, lawyers, doctors, police officers, etc. And just because there are good and bad in every line of work doesn’t mean you don’t call on others for the products and services you need. You still get your haircut, see a doctor, talk to a lawyer, send your kids to school, etc.

Bottom Line

You initially believed that using an agent made sense. It probably still does. Contact a local real estate professional and discuss the possibilities.

How Long Does It Take To Save A Down Payment?

How Long Does It Take To Save A Down Payment? | Keeping Current Matters

In a recent study conducted by Builder.com, researchers determined that nationwide it would take “nearly eight years” for a first-time buyer to save enough for a down payment on their dream home.

Depending on where you live, median rents, incomes and home prices all vary. By determining the percentage a renter spends on housing in each state and the amount needed for a 10% down payment, they were able to establish how long (in years) it would take for an average resident to save.

According to the study, residents in South Dakota are able to save for a down payment the quickest in just under 3.5 years. Below is a map created using the data for each state:

Years Needed to Save 10% Down | Keeping Current Matters

What if you only needed to save 3%?

What if you were able to take advantage of one of the Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae 3% down programs? Suddenly saving for a down payment no longer takes 5 or 10 years, but becomes attainable in under two years in many states as shown in the map below.

Years Needed to Save 3% Down | Keeping Current Matters

Bottom Line

Whether you have just started to save for a down payment, or have been for years, you may be closer to your dream home than you think! Meet with a local real estate professional who can help you evaluate your ability to buy today.

Are You Ready to Sell Your Home?

Time To Sell

 

For most homeowners, being financially ready to sell comes down to one factor: equity. During the housing meltdown of 2008–09, millions of homeowners found themselves with negative equity, which meant they owed more on their homes than they were worth.

Clearly, selling your home when you have negative equity is a bad deal. That’s called a short sale, and it impacts your credit almost as much as a foreclosure. Breaking even on your home sale is better, but it’s still not ideal. If you’re in either situation, don’t sell unless you have to in order to avoid bankruptcy or foreclosure.

For the last several years, home values have been on the rise, and that means most homeowners are building equity. Their homes are now worth more than they owe on them, and that trend will persist as they pay down their mortgages and home values continue to increase.

Financially speaking, it is best to sell your home when you have enough equity to at least cover the down payment on your next home. Or, you can go all the way and use the proceeds to buy your next home outright—no more mortgage for you!

How Much Equity Do You Have?

To figure out how much equity you have in your home, first find out your mortgage balance. That’s easy enough—simply look on your latest mortgage statement.

Next you’ll need to know how much your home is worth. While it’s tempting to use figures from online home valuation sites, they’re not always accurate. You don’t want to base such an important decision on iffy information.

Contact a real estate professional who will compare your home to others that have recently sold and take local market trends into account. You can trust their estimate to reflect what your home is worth based on their experience selling homes in your area.

Are You Ready to Make the Move?

If the numbers show you’re in good shape financially to make a move, great! But don’t forget, selling a home is an emotional issue too. Before you plant the For Sale sign in the front yard, take a minute to answer just a few more questions:

  • Are you ready to put in the work to get your home ready for house hunters?
  • Are you committed to keeping it ready to show for weeks or months?
  • Are you ready to hear the reasons why potential buyers believe your home is not perfect?
  • Are you ready for honest—and sometimes hardball—negotiations over what buyers are willing to pay for your home?
  • Are you really ready to move out and leave the place where your family has made memories?

Don’t get us wrong; we’re not trying to talk you out of selling your home! We just want you to be completely ready when you do decide to move on to the next stage of your family’s life.

A qualified real estate agent will give you a clear picture of what it’s like to sell a home and if now is the right time for you, both financially and emotionally.

(Courtesy Dave Ramsey blog: https://www.daveramsey.com/blog/ready-to-sell-your-home)

Selling Your House? 5 Reasons You Shouldn’t For Sale By Owner

Selling Your House? 5 Reasons You Shouldn't For Sale By Owner | Keeping Current Matters

In today’s market, with homes selling quickly and prices rising, some homeowners might consider trying to sell their home on their own, known in the industry as a For Sale by Owner (FSBO). There are several reasons this might not be a good idea for the vast majority of sellers.

Here are five of those reasons:

1. There Are Too Many People to Negotiate With

Here is a list of some of the people with whom you must be prepared to negotiate if you decide to For Sale By Owner:

  • The buyer who wants the best deal possible
  • The buyer’s agent who solely represents the best interest of the buyer
  • The buyer’s attorney (in some parts of the country)
  • The home inspection companies, which work for the buyer and will almost always, find some problems with the house
  • The appraiser if there is a question of value

2. Exposure to Prospective Purchasers

Recent studies have shown that 89% of buyers search online for a home. That is in comparison to only 20% looking at print newspaper ads. Most real estate agents have an internet strategy to promote the sale of your home. Do you?

3. Results Come from the Internet

Where do buyers find the home they actually purchased?

  • 44% on the internet
  • 33% from a Real Estate Agent
  • 9% from a yard sign
  • 1% from newspaper

The days of selling your house by just putting up a sign and putting it in the paper are long gone. Having a strong internet strategy is crucial.

4. FSBOing has Become More and More Difficult

The paperwork involved in selling and buying a home has increased dramatically as industry disclosures and regulations have become mandatory. This is one of the reasons that the percentage of people FSBOing has dropped from 19% to 8% over the last 20+ years.

The 8% share represents the lowest recorded figure since NAR began collecting data in 1981.

5. You Net More Money when Using an Agent

Many homeowners believe that they will save the real estate commission by selling on their own. Realize that the main reason buyers look at FSBOs is because they also believe they can save the real estate agent’s commission. The seller and buyer can’t both save the commission.

Studies have shown that the typical house sold by the homeowner sells for $210,000 while the typical house sold by an agent sells for $249,000. This doesn’t mean that an agent can get $39,000 more for your home as studies have shown that people are more likely to FSBO in markets with lower price points. However, it does show that selling on your own might not make sense.

Bottom Line

Before you decide to take on the challenges of selling your house on your own, sit with a real estate professional in your marketplace and see what they have to offer.

Buying A Home? Do You Know The Difference Between Cost & Price?

Buying A Home? Do You Know The Difference Between Cost & Price? | Keeping Current Matters

As a seller, you will be most concerned about ‘short term price’ – where home values are headed over the next six months. As a buyer, you must be concerned not about price but instead about the ‘long term cost’ of the home.

The Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA), the National Association of Realtors, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac all projected that mortgage interest rates will increase by about three-quarters of a percentage point over the next twelve months.

According to CoreLogic’s most recent Home Price Index Report, home prices will appreciate by 5.2% over the next 12 months.

What Does This Mean as a Buyer?

Here is a simple demonstration of what impact an interest rate increase would have on the mortgage payment of a home selling for approximately $250,000 today if home prices appreciate by the 5.2% predicted by CoreLogic over the next twelve months:

Cost of Waiting | Keeping Current Matters

Foreclosure Inventory Drops As Economy Improves [INFOGRAPHIC]

Foreclosure Inventory Drops As Economy Improves [INFOGRAPHIC] | Keeping Current Matters

Some Highlights:

  • Foreclosure Inventory has dropped year-over-year for the last 4 years (48 months).
  • Only 3.4% of US homes are in serious delinquency.
  • 29 states have a foreclosure inventory rate lower than the national average.
  • For more information you can download the full report here

Sales Activity Increases, Inventory Drops for Holidays

(Sacramento Association of REALTORS® – RESIDENTIAL RESALE STATISTICS Dec. 2015)

Housing Stat Image

Sales volume for December surged 30.4% to 1,571, a substantial increase from the 1,205 closed escrows in November. The current number is 3.3% above the 1,520 sales of October. Compared with December 2014 (1,313 sales), the current number is up 19.6%. Equity sales made up 90.9% of all sales (1,428 units) for the month. The remainder of sales were REO/bank‐owned (57 units/3.6%) and Short Sales (60/3.8%). Other types of sales (auction, probate, etc.) accounted for 1.7% or 26 sales. Both REO Sales (2.7%) and Short Sales (17.3%) decreased for the month. Equity Sales increased slightly, up .4%.

Breaking down the financing, 225 sales used cash (14.3%), 750 (47.7%) conventional (mortgage‐backed), 415 (26.4%) used FHA (Federal Housing Administration), 103 (5.6%) used VA (Veterans Affairs) and 78 (5%) used Other* types of financing. The graph below compares market inventory and sales volume since May 2010:

Pending sales dropped off to 849, a 31.4% decrease from the 1,237 pending sales in November. Compared with December 2014, however, the current number is up 4.7% (811). The month‐to‐month median sales price jumped 2.1% from $290,885 to $297,000. This figure is 10.8% above the $268,000 median sales price for December 2014. The total dollar value of all closed transactions for the month totaled $508,723,362. This figure is 30.3% higher than the $390,353,522 total last month and 31.7% higher than the total value of December 2014 ($386,253,993). The year‐end sales total is 17,578, up 11.4% from the 15,778 sales at the same time of last year.

The total Active Listing Inventory decreased 18% from 2,150 to 1,749 and the Months of Inventory remained decreased from 1.8 months to 1.1 months. Year‐to‐year, the current number is down 27.9% (3,002 units).

The average DOM (days on market) for homes sold this month increased from 33 to 35 days. The median DOM increased 31% from 16 to 21. These numbers represent the days between the initial listing of the home as “active” and the day it goes “pending.” Breaking down the DOM, there were 964 listings that sold between 1 – 30 days, 329 listings between 31 – 60 days, 136 between 61 – 90 days, 68 between 91 – 120 days and 74 sales that spent over 120+ DOM.

Inventory V Sales SAR DEC 2015

 

The Sacramento Association of REALTORS® is a professional association representing over 5,500 real estate professionals and commercial affiliates doing business in the greater Sacramento metropolitan area. All SAR statistics reports compiled by Tony Vicari, SAR Communications Manager.

Statistics are derived from the MetroList® MLS database for Sacramento County and the City of West Sacramento.