5 Demands You Should Make on Your Listing Agent

5 Demands You Should Make on Your Listing Agent | Keeping Current Matters

Are you thinking of selling your house? Are you dreading having to deal with strangers walking through the house? Are you concerned about getting the paperwork correct? Hiring a professional real estate agent can take away most of the challenges of selling. A great agent is always worth more than the commission they charge; just like a great doctor or great accountant. You want to deal with one of the best agents in your marketplace. To do this, you must be able to distinguish the average agent from the great one. Here are the top 5 demands to make of your Real Estate Agent when selling your house:

1. Tell the truth about the price

Too many agents just take the listing at any price and then try to the ‘work the seller’ for a price correction later. Demand that the agent prove to you that they have a belief in the price they are suggesting. Make them show you their plan to sell the house at that price – TWICE! Every house in today’s market must be sold two times – first to a buyer and then to the bank. The second sale may be more difficult than the first. The residential appraisal process has gotten tougher. A survey showed that there was a challenge with the appraisal on 24% of all residential real estate transactions. It has become more difficult to get the banks to agree on the contract price. A red flag should be raised if your agent is not discussing this with you at the time of the listing.

2. Understand the timetable with which your family is dealing

You will be moving your family to a new home. Whether the move revolves around the start of a new school year or the start of a new job, you will be trying to put the move to a plan. This can be very emotionally draining. Demand from your agent an appreciation for the timetables you are setting. Your agent cannot pick the exact date of your move, but they should exert any influence they can, to make it work.

3. Remove as many of the challenges as possible

It is imperative that your agent knows how to handle the challenges that will arise. An agent’s ability to negotiate is critical in this market.

Remember: If you have an agent who was weak negotiating with you on the parts of the listing contract that were most important to them and their family (commission, length, etc.), don’t expect them to turn into a super hero when they are negotiating for you and your family with the buyer.

4. Help with the relocation

If you haven’t yet picked your new home, make sure the agent is capable and willing to help you. The coordination of the move is crucial. You don’t want to be without a roof over your head the night of the closing. Likewise, you don’t want to end up paying two housing expenses (whether it is rent or mortgage). You should, in most cases, be able to close on your current home and immediately move into your new residence.

5. Get the house SOLD!

There is a reason you are putting yourself and your family through the process of moving. You are moving on with your life in some way. The reason is important or you wouldn’t be dealing with the headaches and challenges that come along with selling. Do not allow your agent to forget these motivations. Constantly remind them that selling the house is why you hired them. Make sure that they don’t worry about your feelings more than they worry about your family. If they discover something needs to be done to attain your goal (i.e. price correction, repair, removing clutter), insist they have the courage to inform you.

Good agents know how to deliver good news. Great agents know how to deliver tough news. In today’s market, YOU NEED A GREAT AGENT!

6 Things Homebuyers Should Avoid Once They are Preapproved for a Mortgage

black couple loan approved

You have done the hard part in the home-buying process and chosen a lender and a real estate agent to work with. You have also gone out and found the home of your dreams! Best of all, your team has done a great job of negotiating the best deal for you.

Now, as a buyer, all you have to do is sit back and wait for your loan to close … right? Wrong!!

Getting a home loan these days is a very interactive process. I am always amazed by how many clients I work with who come to me unaware of all the pitfalls they face during the loan process. To help avoid any surprises while waiting for final approval, I provide my clients with a short list of “do’s and don’ts” to follow.

Let’s start with the “do’s” …

  1. Do keep the process moving by responding to your loan officers’ requests for documentation as soon as possible.
  2. Do make decisions as soon as is reasonably possible.
  3. Do convey questions or concerns you
  4. Do continue to make all of your rent or mortgage payments on time.
  5. Do stay current on all other existing accounts.
  6. Do continue to work your normal work schedule with no unplanned time off.
  7. Do continue to use your credit as normal.
  8. Do be prepared to explain any large deposits in your bank accounts.
  9. Do enjoy purchasing your home but remain objective throughout the process to help make decisions that are best for you.

After you have been preapproved for your mortgage you will want to refrain from the following…

  1. Do not make any major purchases (car, boat, jewelry, furniture, appliances, etc.).
  2. Do not apply for any new credit (even if it says you are preapproved or “xxx days same as cash”).
  3. Do not pay off charges or collections (unless directed by your loan officer to do so).
  4. Do not make any changes to your credit profile.
  5. Do not change bank accounts.
  6. Do not make unusual deposits into your bank accounts or move money around from one account to another.

Follow these simple rules and you will help to make your loan closing as smooth and hassle-free as possible! Good luck!

FHAs Back to Work Program Waives Waiting Times

(Courtesy NKS Financial)


Purchase again sooner than you think

The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) recently announced its “Back to Work” program, which is giving individuals who suffered a long period of hardship during the recent housing crisis a second chance to prove they can carry a mortgage and own a home.

The program will waive many of the waiting periods associated with a significant “economic event” such as bankruptcy (Chapters 7 and 13), short sale or foreclosure.

Potential candidates may be first-time or repeat home buyers, and the program can be used for the 203K rehab loan. It must be approved by an FHA lender, and as some lenders are choosing not to participate, you may want to contact your mortgage professional for more information on this.


To participate in the program, individuals must be able to demonstrate they’ve recovered fully from the “event”, and document the fact that they did have a household income loss of at least 20 percent for a period of at least six months that coincided with the “event.” They also need to prove current, stable and documentable employment to qualify.

As well, they need to demonstrate a 12-month positive payment history, and this specifies on-time payment of all mortgage and installment debt. There is some latitude for credit card debt, but it is slight.

Counseling sessions

Applicants also must attend counseling sessions before being able to participate in the program. This is usually a one-hour session with a HUD-approved counselor, and was designed to help participants prevent the “economic event” from happening again.

Foreclosure: What It Really Means & How To Avoid It

Foreclosure: What It Really Means & How To Avoid It.

Need an Approval from Franklin Credit (In Jr Lien position)?

We just received an approval from Franklin Credit and after much back and forth (one year to be exact), we also received the truth as to what the REALLY are trying to attain.

When your offer with Franklin Credit is declined, Franklin Credit and its employees are instructed to tell you that they cannot give dollar amounts, you just need to resend a better offer. For the past three months, our strategy has been to “up” our offer to them, starting at the promissory note for 10K, then increasing in increments of 20, and slowly increasing the cash contribution to them. This was based on the fact that they won’t disclose an acceptable amount, and the threads which I had read regarding strategy and acceptance with Franklin Credit.

However, I am assuming it was our lucky day when we got a rep on the phone who stated the following (directly from our system file notes): “(Rep) asked how much is he able to bring to the table? I informed of the promissory note of 15,000. (Rep) states regardless if promissory note is signed or not, a minimum of 10% which is 16,342.00 has to be paid. (Rep) advised to send an updated HUD with the corrected payoff amount and resend the higher offer to fax 201-839-XXXX Attention (Rep). ”

We of course called back the next day to confirm the info, but were told (reprimanded would be more like it) that the rep should not have told us that because, again, they are not allowed to disclose figures.

However, on 11/30/09 we acted on the payoff of 10% and were told today that the approval letter had mailed to title (which was weird as well) yesterday. (UPDATE: I just received the letter in my email as well).

I recommend cutting to the chase and “finding” 10 percent of the balance owed and get it over with. They are not the most pleasant people to deal with either.

I also recommend dealing ONLY with the supervisor once you know that your acceptable offer is there for fast expedition (and she’s much nicer to deal with). Email me if you’d like that info (sorry, REALTOR’s only) (keisha.mathews@century21.com)

Because this info is so hard to come by, I only ask that you PLEASE respect her info and DO NOT bother her until you are ready to go straight to the ten percent. If you bother her with the small stuff you may make it harder on others trying to attain legitimate approvals.

Hope that helps! See ya in escrow!

Keisha M. Mathews, CDPE, REALTOR® | License# 01439130
The Short Sale LadyTM | Century 21 Landmark Network
(916) 266-4835 office – direct | (916) 405-3886 efax