Tag Archives: Elk Grove short sale

There’s No Place Like Home

 

Last week, we reported on the financial reasons purchasing a home in today’s market makes sense. The Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University performs a study every year surveying participants for the reasons that American’s feel are most important in regards to homeownership.
Last week, we reported on the financial reasons purchasing a home in today’s market makes sense. The Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University performs a study every year surveying participants for the reasons that American’s feel are most important in regards to homeownership.

 

The top 4 reasons to own a home cited by respondents were not financial.

1. It means having a good place to raise children & provide them with a good education

From the best neighborhoods to the best school districts, even those without children at the time of purchasing their home, may have this in the back of their mind as a major reason for choosing the location of the home that they purchase.

2. You have a physical structure where you & your family feel safe

It is no surprise that having a place to call home with all that means in comfort and security is the #2 reason.

3. It allows you to have more space for your family

Whether your family is expanding, or an older family member is moving in, having a home that fits your needs is a close third on the list.

4. It gives you control over what you do with your living space, like renovations and updates

Looking to actually try one of those complicated wall treatments that you saw on Pinterest? Want to finally adopt that puppy or kitten you’ve seen online 100 times? Who’s to say that you can’t in your own home?

The 5th reason on the list, is the #1 financial reason to buy a home as seen by respondents:

5. Owning a home is a good way to build up wealth that can be passed along to my family

Either way you are paying a mortgage. Why not lock in your housing expense now with an investment that will build equity that you can borrow against in the future?

Bottom Line

Whether you are a first time homebuyer or a move-up buyer who wants to start a new chapter in their life, now is a great time to reflect on the intangible factors that make a house a home.

Five Reasons To Sell Now

(Courtesy of The KCM Crew on February 2, 2015)

No-Matter-What Flower

Is spring closer than we think? Depending on which Groundhog you witnessed today, you may have less time than you think to get your home on the market before the busy spring season.

Many sellers feel that the spring is the best time to place their home on the market as buyer demand traditionally increases at that time of year. However, the next six weeks before spring hits also have their own advantages.

Here are five reasons to sell now.

1. Demand is Strong

Foot traffic refers to the number of people out actually physically looking at homes right now. The latest foot traffic numbers show that there are currently more prospective purchasers looking at homes than at any other time in the last 12 months, which includes last spring’s buyers’ market. These buyers are ready, willing and able to purchase… and are in the market right now!

Take advantage of the buyer activity currently in the market.

2. There Is Less Competition Now

Housing supply just dropped to 4.4 months, which is under the 6 months’ supply that is needed for a normal housing market. This means, in many areas, there are not enough homes for sale to satisfy the number of buyers in that market. This is good news for home prices. However, additional inventory is about to come to market.

There is a pent-up desire for many homeowners to move, as they were unable to sell over the last few years because of a negative equity situation. Homeowners are now seeing a return to positive equity as real estate values have increased over the last two years. Many of these homes will be coming to the market in the near future.

Also, new construction of single-family homes is again beginning to increase. A recent study by Harris Poll revealed that 41% of buyers would prefer to buy a new home while only 21% prefer an existing home (38% had no preference).

The choices buyers have will increase in the spring. Don’t wait until all this other inventory of homes comes to market before you sell.

3. The Process Will Be Quicker

One of the biggest challenges of the housing market has been the length of time it takes from contract to closing. Banks are requiring more and more paperwork before approving a mortgage. There is less overall business done in the winter. Therefore, the process will be less onerous than it will be in the spring. Getting your house sold and closed before the spring delays begin will lend itself to a smoother transaction.

4. There Will Never Be a Better Time to Move-Up

If you are moving up to a larger, more expensive home, consider doing it now. Prices are projected to appreciate by over 23.5% from now to 2019. If you are moving to a higher priced home, it will wind-up costing you more in raw dollars (both in down payment and mortgage payment) if you wait. You can also lock-in your 30-year housing expense with an interest rate below 4% right now. Rates are projected to be a full point higher by the end of 2015.

5. It’s Time to Move On with Your Life

Look at the reason you decided to sell in the first place and determine whether it is worth waiting. Is money more important than being with family? Is money more important than your health? Is money more important than having the freedom to go on with your life the way you think you should?

Only you know the answers to the questions above. You have the power to take back control of the situation by putting your home on the market. Perhaps, the time has come for you and your family to move on and start living the life you desire.

That is what is truly important.

How Soon Can We Buy After A Short Sale

(Courtesy of REALTOR.COM Ask Michele, Buy, Finance |  By: Michele Lerner)

question-mark-house-red1

QUESTION: We had to do a short sale on our home in Nevada last year, but now we have landed on our feet again and want to buy a home in our new location in Oregon. We have enough money saved up for a 20 percent down payment for a house we can afford. Is it possible for us to qualify for a mortgage?

ANSWER: It’s great that you landed on your feet and have been able to save money for a down payment on a new house. Your bigger down payment can be a compensating factor that some lenders will use to qualify you for a loan in spite of a negative credit profile that’s a likely result of the short sale.

Conventional loan guidelines established by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac say that you must wait two years after the closing date on your short sale to finance another home, if you have 20 percent for a down payment. You would have to wait longer if you had less cash for a down payment (four years with 10 percent and seven years with less than 10 percent). So if you want a conventional loan, you’ll need to wait another year.

FHA-insured loans are available with a down payment of as little as 3.5 percent after a three-year waiting period. Veterans Administration loans, which don’t require a down payment at all, are available after a two-year waiting period.

However, the FHA recently introduced a “Back to Work – Extenuating Circumstances” program to help the many people who lost their homes during the recent housing crisis and recession. You may qualify now for this program if you lost your home due to a job loss or a drop in income or both. This temporary loan program will be available for FHA loans issued between Aug.t 15, 2013, and Sept. 30, 2016.

To qualify, you’ll have to meet standard FHA guidelines for a loan approval and a mortgage lender’s requirements. Typically, this means that your credit score must be 620 or 640 and above and your debt-to-income ratio must be 41 percent to 43 percent or less.  You’ll be required to fully document your job history, income and assets.

In addition, the Back to Work program has other specific requirements. You must:

  • Participate in an FHA-approved housing counseling program.
  • Provide documentation for the “economic event” that caused the bankruptcy, which must have reduced your income by 20 percent or more for at least six months. In other words, you’ll need a W2 or tax returns or a termination letter.
  • Prove that you had good credit before the economic event damaged it.
  • Prove that you’ve fully recovered from the event by having a credit report without any late payments for at least 12 months on installment debt and without any major derogatory comments on revolving credit accounts. Your report cannot show any judgments or collections unless they’re related to medical bills or identity theft.

Consult a mortgage lender to see if you can qualify for this FHA program, but remember that FHA loans require mortgage insurance for at least 11 years, even if you make a down payment of 20 percent. You may want to consider asking a mortgage lender if any exceptions are possible for individuals who want to apply for a conventional loan after a short sale. If not, you should weigh the benefit of waiting one more year to buy a home rather than committing to years of mortgage insurance payments.

Home sales in a lull, median sales price stalls, inventory hovers over 3,400

OCTOBER  2014 RESIDENTIAL SALES STATISTICS

Sales volume decreased for the third straight month, closing with 1,375 single family home sales. This is down 1.5% from the 1,396 homes sold last month. Month‐to‐month since July, sales have decreased 1,548 – 1,428 – 1,396 – 1,375, respectively. Compared with last year, the current figure is down .8% (1,386 sales). Making up this month’s total are 1,208 Equity Sales (87.9%), 83 Short Sales (6%) and 84 REO sales (6.1%). For the month, REO sales remained the same, short sales increased 17.6% and conventional sales decreased 1.1%.

Of the 1,375 sales this month, 256 used cash financing, 654 used conventional (mortgage‐backed) financing, 312 used FHA (Federal Housing Administration), 89 used VA (Veteran’s Affairs) and 64 used Other* types of financing. The average DOM (days on market) for homes sold this month was 37, while the Median DOM was 23. These numbers represent the days between the initial listing of the home as “active” and the day it goes “pending.” Breaking down the Days On Market, there were 816 listings that sold between 1 – 30 days, 293 listings that sold between 31 – 60 days, 148 between 61 – 90 days, 69 between 91 – 120 days and 49 sold after being on the market for over 120 days. This breakdown, as well as types of financing, is show in the graphic below.

October 2014 Housing Stat

The month‐to‐month median sales price decreased 1.1% from $275,000 to $272,000. The current level is 7.3% above the $253,500 median sales price of October 2013. The current figure is up 70% from the January 2012 low of $160,000. When compared to the all‐time high ($392,750/Aug. ’08), the current figure is down 30.1%.

Active Listing Inventory in Sacramento County decreased 2.7% for the month to 3,434 listings, down from the 3,529 listings of September. Year‐to‐year, the current number is up (29.1%) from the 2,659 units of October 2013. The months of inventory remained the same at 2.5 months.

Creating a Pet-Friendly Home

carpet-cleaning-derby2A pet-friendly home is not just a fun and safe space for your pet, but also a space that can stand up to the kinds of things pets do to houses. Making pet-friendly choices in landscaping, design, and the materials you use will ensure that both you and your pet can enjoy your shared space together.

Opt for durable flooring – Even if your pet is perfectly well house-trained, they’re bound to have an accident or two. Choose a flooring material that’s easy to clean and won’t be damaged by accidents. Linoleum cleans easily and is naturally anti-microbial. Bamboo, cork, tile, and stone are also good picks. If you want carpet, try a modular kind, made of separate carpet squares. Buy back-up squares so if a section gets ruined, you can pop it out and replace it. Avoid wood and laminate floors. Wood is easily scratched and damaged by water and slippery laminate can cause injuries.

Choose pet-friendly materials and décor – Opt for satin paint instead of flat paint on walls. A glossier finish won’t show stains as prominently and wipes clean. Chose low VOC (volatile organic compounds) paints, especially if your pet bites or licks walls. Match the colors of throw rugs, upholstery, and other décor to your pet’s fur color to give yourself a little more leeway in how frequently you’ll be vacuuming and de-furring the furniture. Set up a feeding area in a spot where you won’t be accidentally kicking over the water bowl. Find a nearby place to store dog food, ideally in a sealed container, like a plastic bin or a metal garbage can with a lid.

Protect furniture – Choose upholstered pieces covered in tough, easily-cleaned fabrics like leather or ultrasuede. Consider washable slipcovers, throws to protect furniture, or extra-durable fabric designed especially for pet owners. Keep pets from chewing furniture by spraying with store-bought, anti-chewing spray or applying a bit of cayenne pepper to their favorite biting spots. If you need to keep a pet out of a particular area, put up baby gates and provide the pet with plenty of sturdy toys for diversion. Set up a special bed or blanket so your pet has a comfortable, cushiony place of his own.

Eliminate dangers around the house – Walk around your house and assess possible pet hazards. Move chemicals and cleaning materials to high shelves or locked cabinets. Make sure trash cans are safely secured so pets don’t get into something that could be harmful to them. (Many common household articles are toxic to pets including: coffee grounds, onions, grapes, and even nutmeg.) Latch lower cabinets with child locks if necessary and keep curtain and electrical cords out of pet reach. Put screens in upper level windows and make sure they’re intact and securely attached. Keep toilet lids closed and avoid automatic bowl cleaners. Wipe up spills in the driveway and garage immediately so pets don’t ingest poisons like antifreeze. Remove any indoor plants that are toxic to pets. You can find a list of toxic and non-toxic plants on the Humane Society’s web site (www.humanesociety.org).

Consider a pet door – If you are frequently away from home, consider putting in a pet door. Pet doors can be put in windows, doors, and walls. Smart models recognize your pet electronically and will only open for them, not for other animals. The doors can be controlled remotely and deactivated if you need the pet to stay inside. If you’re worried about the resale value of cutting a hole in the wall, consider a model that’s built into a glass sliding door. When you sell, you can replace that part of the door with a regular slider.

Create a yard for pets and people to share – Find safe, pet-friendly materials for plants and hardscape. Put in some mint or catnip for cats and a clover ground cover for dogs because it won’t yellow with urine. Outdoor cats like places to hide and things to climb and will make good use of trees and bushy areas. Dogs instinctively patrol the perimeter of the property and like running paths that follow the yard’s circumference. If your dog has already created a path, embrace it, covering it with mulch and lining with attractive plantings. Make sure your fence is in good condition with no secret ways out (including benches, large rocks, or other items that can serve as pet launching pads). Consider putting in a small eye-level panel in the fence so dog can peek out and keep a watch on things. For safety, keep sharp tools put away, keep compost bins covered, and avoid chemical like fertilizers and pesticides. Make sure plants are non-toxic and avoid plants with thorns. And pets like a lot of the same things humans like, so you’ll both be pleased if your yard has a shady spot to cool off and comfy places to sit.

Changes to the B of A Short Sale process

Considering a short sale as a Bank of America mortgage holder? Well make sure you hire an experienced, proven short-sale agent and that they are current on that lender’s process.

Below describes some new changes to B of A’s shot sale process imperative tot he successful completion of your short sale.

(Re-Printed from B of A email correspondence 07/31/2014)

Bank of America Help for Homeowners in Sacramento and Elk Groveac
Bank of America Help for Homeowners in Sacramento and Elk Groveac
The new Initiation Package assists a homeowner through the Short Sale process.  Starting mid-July, homeowners will receive a short sale Initiation Package upon initiating a short sale and not being reviewed for a home retention option. Included in the package is the Borrower Election Form that will now be required before proceeding with a short sale.The short sale transaction will no longer continue and no other homeowner documentation or offers will be reviewed until the signed Borrower Election Form is received and verified by the Short Sale Specialist. As a reminder, for your agent, a valid Third-Party Authorization Form is also required and must be verified in order to proceed with the transaction.

As a homeowner, thoroughly read this package including the Homeowner Checklist. This package contains a list of financial documents that may be required to complete a short sale. B of A’s ability to evaluate the homeowner for a short sale, as well as postpone collection and foreclosure efforts, depends on their receipt of all necessary documents. Upon initiation, a Short Sale Specialist will continue to contact your agent, to discuss the next steps in the short sale process.

Initiation Package Includes:

  1. Homeowner Checklist
  2. Information on Loan Assistance Programs
  3. Frequently Asked Questions
  4. Important Notice to Help You Avoid Foreclosure Scams
  5. Borrower Election Form – now required upon initiation
  6. Third-Party Authorization
  7. Request for Mortgage Assistance (RMA) form
  8. IRS Form 4506-T

Please note: initiating directly into a short sale, through Equator, is not an option for Federal Housing Administration (FHA) investor properties. Homeowners must always discuss their situation with their Customer Relationship Manager (CRM), who can help them identify if they qualify for an exception to proceed with a short sale without doing a full home retention review.


Short Sale Customer / Agent Care
1.866.880.1232

bankofamerica.com/shortsaleagent

If you have questions, first contact your short sale specialist (or closing officer) through Equator messaging. If there’s no response after two days, escalate to the team lead.

For urgent needs (such as a foreclosure postponement) or for escalation beyond the team lead, contact Short Sale Customer/Agent Care at 1.866.880.1232.

Visit the Agent Resource Center at bankofamerica.com/sh

3 Things You Didn’t Know About Short Sales

You'll be surprised to learn this about short sales.
You’ll be surprised to learn this about short sales. Elk Grove & Sacramento Short Sales.

Short sales have become a part of the normal fabric of real estate business. At a minimum, most people now understand the term “short sale” doesn’t mean the sale will be short, will take less time, or that the price the home will sell for will be much less than market value.

Surprisingly though, there is still a large segment of the population unaware of what may probably be three of the most important benefits to completing a short sale. With that being said, you too may be surprised to learn that, if you complete a short sale there may be:

1. No cost to you, the seller
That’s right. For the majority of sellers, to complete a short sale is totally free. The proceeds from the sale cover the costs associated with the sale, and your lender approves all fees. For example: title and escrow fees, state mandated items (NHD reports), broker fees for service (commissions), and most lenders even pay outstanding property tax liens!

You should never be asked to pay a fee to complete your short sale. If an agent asks you to pay a fee as a requirement to start or complete your short sale, find another agent.

2. Zero Tax Liability, Zero Deficiency Liability
Tax Liability – In the past, when you completed a short sale, your lender would send you a 1099 and view the forgiven difference as taxable income for the year. This gets filed with your next tax return and, unless you have an exemption, you must pay taxes on the forgiven income. This would, of course, push most people into a new tax bracket requiring you to pay taxes on that forgiven difference.

For example:
Loan Amount Owed $300,000
-Short Sale Price $160,000
Difference $140,000

However, for owner occupied residences, the Debt Forgiveness Act allows tax liability protection on the difference up to $250,000 if you are single, and $500,000 if you are married. President Obama recently extended the act until December 31, 2013. So let’s apply this law to our example above:

Loan Amount Owed $300,000
-Short Sale Price $160,000
Difference $140,000 = FORGIVEN!!
Up to $250,000 (single); $500,000 (married)

In addition, there are numerous exemptions that apply which can enable you to avoid this tax even if it is not your primary residence.

Deficiency (In the state of California) – The California Legislature passed Senate Bill 931 adding Section 580e to the California Code of Civil Procedure and stating that the senior lien holder could not pursue a deficiency judgment after a short sale which they had previously approved. The law equally applies to purchase money, hard money and refinance – as long as there was no cash out.

They later passed Senate Bill 458, amending Section 580e and extending the protection of SB 931, by making it applicable to junior liens as well. In addition to not being able to get a deficiency judgment it provides that after a short sale, no deficiency shall be owed or collected and no deficiency judgment shall be requested or rendered provided the short sale closed escrow and the lender was paid the amount they agreed to accept.

The amended law further provides that the holder of a note shall not require the seller to pay any additional compensation, aside from the proceeds of the sale, in exchange for their consent to the short sale.

How’s that for protection? So, to recap – you get to complete a short sale at no cost to you, your debt and deficiency are also forgiven, and the lender cannot ask you to come in with any additional funds above the amount they agree to accept. What more could you ask for? How about cash back?

3. Cash Back to You
Lenders learned rather quickly the magnitude of the financial responsibilities which came with foreclosed properties; tax liens, outstanding utility bills, property damage, vandalism, etc – all at a very large price tag and not including their standard attorney fees. So not only did it make sense to pay the seller an incentive to remain in the home and keep the home in good condition until close of escrow, but it also helped the seller with moving expenses as well. This turned out to be a win-win situation for everyone. Thus, relocation assistance was born and adopted.

How much assistance you will receive and specific assistance guidelines will vary. For example, if you short sale under HAFA (Home Affordable Foreclosure Alternative), you could receive $3000. However, many lenders now have their own in-house incentive programs which offer relocation assistance anywhere from $3000 to as much as $30,000 or more.

So if you are facing foreclosure, contact Mathews & Co Realty Group with Century 21 Landmark Networ at (916) 678-1803 or me, Keisha Mathews, (team short sale specialist) via direct email at SacramentoShortSaleLady@gmail.com. I would be happy to meet with you to go over your options helping you avoid foreclosure, and explain how you could reap the many benefits as well.

The information contained above is not to be construed as legal or tax advice. Each individual’s personal situation may vary. We at Mathews & Co Realty Group are not tax professionals or attorneys. Please consult a real estate attorney or tax advisor to determine whether the information above is applicable to your individual situation.

Market Update – Seriously, It’s A Sellers’ Market

new home construction n elk groveHomeowners who lost their homes at unprecedented numbers inadvertently created extraordinary opportunities of home ownership for both investors and owner occupants. Upside down home ownership blazed a grave trail with foreclosures and short sales (distressed sales) paving the way of Sacramento’s “buyers’ market”.

The recovery has been painful and volatile. At the height of the crisis, industry analysts were incredibly optimistic predicting it would last only a year or two at the most. Seven years later forecasting continues to be a challenge. Just as the mainstream media seems to sync with the analysts, Bernake speaks, interest rates bump up overnight, and you and I get to buckle up for another exciting ride in the wonderful world of real estate. However, there is actual evidence that recovery may truly be underway.

AND NOW THE LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL

An analysis by RealtyTrac Inc. shows Sacramento as one of the hottest turn-around markets and predicts we are headed for a more normal pattern because of a rapid increase in new-housing permits at the start of this year and a significant drop in foreclosures.

To give you an idea of what that foreclosure drop looks like and some comparisons, the breakdown of sales for May was 115 REOs (6.9%), 371 short sales (22.2%) and 1,186 conventional sales (70.9%). Compared to one year ago, REO (bankowned) sales accounted for 27.8%, short sales 30.1% and conventional sales 42.2%. Since then REOs have dropped 75.1%, short sales dropped 26.2% and conventional sales have increased 68%.

However, low inventory remains a serious issue for buyers, especially would be first time buyers. Compared with May 2012, the sales volume has decreased 7.9% from the 1,816 units sold. Although active listing inventory increased for the month of May, rising 7.7% from 1,381 units to 1,488 units, the months of inventory remained at .9. This number explains the amount of time (in months) that it would take to deplete the current inventory at the current sales rate.

SAR President Chris Little adds his observations: “The number of listings continues to decline and months of inventory remain exceptionally low with supplies lasting less than 3 weeks. Both the median and mean sales prices continue to increase significantly and cash buyers, though significant, are a declining portion of the buyers.”

WHERE’S THAT LIGHT AGAIN?

So when will we begin to see some of this new inventory from the housing permit increase? According to an article in the Sacramento Business journal, “Large homebuilders are snapping up the available lots out there, with plans to build on them as soon as possible, according to Jim Radler of Land Advisors organization in Sacramento… JMC Homes bought 54 finished lots called Sienna in an unincorporated area north of Elk Grove, between Calvine and Robbins roads and east of Elk Grove/Florin Road, near a strip mall.” As soon as this time next year we can begin to see move-in ready new home construction.

SAR President Chris Little continues, “Demand is high, supply is very low and investors are moving away. If interest rates continue to rise and lender practices continue to be stringent, it may flatten the rising demand due to challenges for buyers on the financing side. Therefore, homeowners with equity and a desire to sell should act on it and consult a REALTOR®.”

All these combine to make it a STRONG sellers’ market. With inventory on the rise and interest rates still at record lows, it’s STILL a great time to buy and sell. If you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell, give us a call.

(Market Data – Sacramento Association of REALTOR’s RESIDENTIAL RESALE STATISTICS May 2013)

Bank of America Electronic Signatures Requiremen​ts

Memo from Bank of America:

Bank of America accepts electronic signatures on most documents collected throughout the processing of short sales; however there are specific requirements that must be met in order for the documents to be accepted.  If these requirements are not met the short sale process may experience significant delays and may result in the decline of the file.

Agents choosing to use e-signatures will need to check with their electronic service provider to ensure the below requirements can be met prior to initiating a short sale. Currently, DocuSign is one provider that has shown they have the capability to meet our security requirements. However, this should not be construed as an endorsement, or recommendation of their work, and agents and sellers should use their own best judgment in choosing a provider.

Requirement

Details

Certificate of Completion Serves as a receipt showing exactly who signed, how they signed and where the signing took place.

The Certificate of Completion must incorporate:

  1. IP Address of each signer
  • Disclosed Authentication/Security levels of e-signature user
    1. Knowledge Based Authentication (KBA) allows signers to validate their identity – ID check must have a passed result showing
    2. Email address exclusive to each user/signer on the signing platform
    3. Account Authentication (password, passcode, or access code)
  • Global Unique Identifier or ID number or Transaction number

To meet authentication requirements for e-signed transactions, all three items must be included on the Certificate of Completion on each e-signature transaction for any customer or authorized third party (user/signer).

Bank of America E-Transaction Consent Disclosure Form
  • The required E-Transaction Consent Disclosure Form can be found on the Agent Resource Center under the “Short Sale forms” section.
  • Each electronic signer must consent and agree. The Consent must be signed electronically for those that have signed the documents electronically.
  • All four pages are required and must be fully executed.

Any e-signature platform selected by an agent must comply with the above requirements in order for the documents to be accepted by Bank of America.  There are no exceptions to these requirements.  If the requirements are not met when documents are submitted at the time of initiation the documents will be rejected.