A Housing Bubble? Industry Experts Say NO!

A Housing Bubble? Industry Experts Say NO! | MyKCM

With residential home prices continuing to appreciate at levels above historic norms, some are questioning if we are heading toward another housing bubble (and subsequent burst) like the one we experienced in 2006-2008.

Recently, five housing experts weighed in on the question.

Rick Sharga, Executive VP at Ten-X:

“We’re definitely not in a bubble.”

“We have a handful of markets that are frothy and probably have hit an affordability wall of sorts but…while prices nominally have surpassed the 2006 peak, we’re not talking about 2006 dollars.”

Christopher Thornberg, Partner at Beacon Economics:

“There is no direct or indirect sign of any kind of bubble.”

“Steady as she goes. Prices continue to rise. Sales roughly flat.…Overall this market is in an almost boring place.”

Bill McBride, Calculated Risk:

“I wouldn’t call house prices a bubble.”

“So prices may be a little overvalued, but there is little speculation and I don’t expect house prices to decline nationally like during the bust.”

David M. Blitzer, Managing Director and Chairman of the Index Committee atS&P Dow Jones Indices:

“Housing is not repeating the bubble period of 2000-2006.”

“…price increases vary unlike the earlier period when rising prices were almost universal; the number of homes sold annually is 20% less today than in the earlier period and the months’ supply is declining, not surging.”

Bing Bai & Edward Golding, Urban Institute:

“We are not in a bubble and nowhere near the situation preceding the 2008 housing crisis.”

“Despite recent increases, house prices remain affordable by historical standards, suggesting that home prices are tracking a broader economic expansion.”

Why You Should Stop Renting & Buy Today!

Why You Should Stop Renting & Buy Today! | Keeping Current Matters

There are many young people debating whether they should renew the lease on their apartment or sign a contract to purchase their first home.

Housing Cost & Net Worth

Whether you rent or buy, you have a monthly housing cost.

As a buyer, you are paying YOUR mortgage.

Every mortgage payment is a form of what Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies calls “forced savings.”

“Since many people have trouble saving and have to make a housing payment one way or the other, owning a home can overcome people’s tendency to defer savings to another day.”

The principal portion of your mortgage payment helps build your net worth through building the equity you have in your home.

As a renter, you are paying YOUR LANDLORD’Smortgage.

Below is an example of the home equity that would be accrued over the course of the next four years if you were to buy a home by the end of this year; based on the results of the Home Price Expectation Survey.

Home Equity Over The Next 4 Years | Keeping Current Matters

In this example, simply by paying your mortgage, you have just increased your net worth by over $34,000!

Bottom Line

Use your monthly housing cost to your advantage! Meet with a local real estate professional who can explain the opportunities available in your market.

Why Does A Seller Need to Know How I’m Financing My Purchase: What’s the Best Financing Method?

Puzzled LookAs a buyer, have you wondered why is what type of financing you use important? Or why does the seller need to know how you are financing your purchase? Or both?

The type of financing you use is important because, as a seller, you have the right to know how someone plans to purchase your property as well as to see evidence of that person’s ability to purchase. In addition, certain types of financing may not be accepted.

As a seller, you can choose what financing terms you will accept or will not accept. Most sellers are, of course, open to as many financing types as possible. However, in rare instances, specific financing types are sometimes prerequisites to being able to make an offer to purchase. For example, pending HOA litigation in a condo development would trigger this prerequisite. The HOA company will only allow sellers to accept owner occupied buyers with all cash offers or conventional financing.

Additionally, financing has its strengths and weaknesses. A general rule is outlined below recognizing there are always exceptions, and the seller has the final say.

STRONGEST
Cash
Conventional Loan
FHA Loan
FHA with DPA (Down Payment Assistance)
VA Loan
WEAKEST

As you can see, cash is at the top of the list – it is still and will always be king. The VA loan is at the bottom of the list and it is bitter sweet.

Nicknamed the “No-No Loan” the VA loan is structured to be a great tool and benefit to allow our vets to become homeowners. No down payment, no closing costs. The VA buyer isn’t even allowed to pay certain costs associated with closing the loan. Sounds great in theory, however, those costs get passed on most times to the seller who gets to say yes or no to paying them. In a competitive market, this offer gets placed on the bottom of the pile because the seller is netting the least from these offers.

The other loans in between have varying resemblances to the VA loan because they require the seller to give up potential proceeds to make the loan happen for the buyer.

Ultimately, the more cash the buyer puts in, the more of the risk they are taking. The less cash the buyer puts in, the less risk. To a seller, the seller would rather see more risk to ensure your commitment and to increase the possibility of closing.

The above is offered as a guideline and is not set in stone as to what will always happen. There are many other ways your broker/agent can ensure you are making a strong offer no matter what your financing. In all that you do as a buyer, choosing a savvy broker/agent will ensure you are making the strongest offer for your money and budget.

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